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Portable Culture Portrait: platisc

Our Portable Culture Portrait blog series features TOM BIHN Forum members, the bags they carry, and the items they carry in their bags. It’s inspired by our Portable Culture tagline. This edition features Forum member platisc. The previous editions featured Forum members ceepee, sea_otter3, NWHikerGal, widepipe, Rocks, JonC, cdh, Badger, haraya, imahawki, Amy, Perseffect, jujigatame and bchaplin.

Portable Culture Portrait platisc TOM BIHN Blog
platisc with his Small Shop Bag + A30 (with Absolute Shoulder Strap)

What’s the most useful item that you carry?

Bellroy’s Phone Pocket is something that continuously satisfies me. It’s a combo phone case and wallet that often houses quick-grab documents like receipts or tickets. It’s a beautiful accessory that I enjoy holding in hand as much as tossing into the sling-accessible side pocket of my S19 or into the bottle pocket of my shop bag. I operate a small inn, so my work follows me onto sandy beaches and dusty trails long after I depart the office. I’m constantly in and out of this thing for my phone, responding to guest needs or inquiries, so I’d be hard-pressed to find something more useful outside of the phone itself. Carrying the device that keeps me connected, along with all my cash, coin and documents for the day has to qualify this piece as my most useful. Plus, it’s just always nice when the repetitive motions of everyday duties can be pleasant interactions.

What’s your most treasured item?

Over the past few years, I’ve developed a strange relationship with all of my material possessions. As minimalism and the art of de-cluttering have gained traction, my own goods have continuously been pared down in a quality-over-quantity ideal. As a result, I feel that mostly everything that I do own and use brings me great joy each time I reach for it – and if it doesn’t, I’ll start debating an upgrade! This leaves me in a space where I feel grateful for everything that I have, but don’t necessarily favor or treasure one thing over another. There is no pocket-watch that’s been handed down from generations, or secret diary that makes its way onto every trip (though I do journal quite often). My old Smart Alec kickstarted this philosophy (like any great backpack can), as the great thing that carried my things. It was my best friend, and accompanied me through many countries and great adventures, as I strived to fill it with contents that could match its subtle beauty and durability. Now, for the sake of picking a single item (outside of my Aeronaut 30 which is another best-friend type bag), I’d say my Outlier Slim Dungarees. I’ve always valued comfort and function in my clothing, even as a kid who complained that my jeans were restricting. I’ve worn my Slim Dungaree pants and felt comfortable and confident on airplanes, to formal meetings, at work, in the ocean, on the basketball court and beyond. Like my bags and gear, I don’t have much clothing, but the garments I do have definitely don’t restrict me anymore, and all follow the “Be Prepared” motto that I try to still live by.

Which item do you use more often than you thought you would?

My Small Shop Bag. I wrote a bit of a love-letter post when I received it because it instantly exceeded my expectations. For over a year, my Small Shop Bag functioned as my EDC bag, and it rested perfectly in my bicycle’s trunk to and from work. Now, its days are a bit more varied. I use it to transport large items like my tongue drum or a basketball. It’s always with me on trips to make ends meet if I overpack, purchase anything additional, or just want quick-access items under my airplane seat. Fearless, durable, and easily cleaned, it never ceases to surprise me – like when it happily smuggles in pizza slices to my local outdoor cinema. It’s now most often (and gloriously so) a beach bag, carrying with ease my phone, wallet, goggles, blanket, snacks + water, nook and more. It seems to hold whatever I need with a minimal footprint, and if/when not in use, it packs into a large Q-Kit perfectly. It’s just a bag that I love looking at and have used in so many different ways on all sorts of unexpected occasions. Love it.

Tech and Accessories

Portable Culture Portait: platisc TOM BIHN Blog

  • 11” Macbook Air (in vertical cache, stowed in A30 backpack strap pocket)
  • Nook GlowLight (in pouch)
  • Medium Double Organizer Pouch (used for travel documents, receipts, etc.)
  • USA /EU USB adapters, micro usb plug, lightning charger, Anker portable battery (inside a small Q-Kit)
  • Assorted toiletries – thumbs up for Schmidt’s Deodorant and essential oils (inside a size 6 stuff sack)
  • Bellroy Phone Pocket (phone, wallet, quick-documents), Bellroy Key Cover, Apple headphones, Moleskine notebook, Person sunglasses (inside Navy parapack Side Effect)
  • Assorted toolset (often a multi-tool like a leatherman, this trip happened to have this set)

*NOTE* – Not pictured but typically packed is a stacked First Aid Kit inside TOM BIHN’s First Aid Pouch)

Clothing

Portable Culture Portrait platisc TOM BIHN Blog

  • Mission Workshop Orion jacket (inside a Pocket Travel Pillow)
  • 2x Outlier Mojave Pivot short-sleeve shirt
  • Outlier Air Forged Oxford
  • 2x Outlier Runweight Merino Tee
  • Outlier Ultralight Track Jacket
  • Outlier Futureworks
  • Outlier Slim Dungarees
  • Outlier New Way Shorts
  • Outlier Ultrafine Merino Magnetic Bandana

*NOTE*: pictured is a Medium eBags packing cube. I’ve since upgraded to TOM BIHN’s Aeronaut 30 Packing Cube Backpack, which I love.

Everything In Its Case

Portable Culture Portrait platisc TOM BIHN Blog

About Me

Home is where the bags go. I’m a Brooklyn born self-employed traveler at heart who currently operates a small inn on the island of Santorini, Greece. I make a point to love where I live, wherever I may be, and I find this easier to do so by bringing along only the gear and bags that I deem necessary to pick up and go. Everything (material) that I love and need fits into my bags, and so the philosophy of being able to pack and move at any notice keeps an adventurous fire underneath my feet, even though I adhere to the daily responsibilities of running a business. Winter months you’ll find me back in the birthplace of New York City and far beyond – taking my bags to new lands, seeing how they react to different environments and unexpected scenarios (my favorite). I have many friends, family, and a loving partner, and they all tease me about my relationship with my bags. I just hope I never lose the love I have for such reliable companions. A special thanks to Brooklyn-based Outlier for building unfailing clothing of radical quality, and of course to the TOM BIHN crew and community for creating such thoughtful and dependable designs for everyday living and beyond.

The Hats Knitted for the TOM BIHN Crew

Hats knitted by the TOM BIHN Ravelry group for the TOM BIHN Crew

Every year, the TOM BIHN Ravelry group knits wearable gifts for our crew. Some years the wearables have been scarves or gloves, and this year it was hats. We know a thing or two about materials and quality craftsmanship, and we’re in awe of what the group makes for us.

From all of us here at TOM BIHN to the TB Ravelry Group: thank you! The wearables you make for us are a big part of our annual holiday party, and everyone looks forward to choosing an item. Special thanks goes to Annie, a knitter and Ravelry member local to Seattle who coordinates the whole effort and delivers the knitted items. (Annie is also the person who knitted G.I. Joe’s hat — see below.)

Below are just a few of the photos; click through to read the whole post and see all 40-or-so (we lost count) photos of the hats and our crew.

Hand-knitted hats for the TOM BIHN crew made by the TOM BIHN Ravelry Group
(Yes, there’s a story behind this.)

A TOM BIHN Cocktail for New Year’s

When @icarusrex posted his “TOM BIHN Travel Bar” set-up on the Forums, we had an idea: we could ask him to craft a TOM BIHN cocktail.

We polled the crew here at TB about their favorite cocktails and mixed drinks and shared that with
@icarusrex for inspiration. Here’s the cocktails he came up with (of course, we had to test the recipes, and yes they’re very good) plus a couple of amateur creations of our own, just in time for New Year’s.

Alcoholic Drinks

TB Cocktail (Sweet & Spicy)

1 1/2 oz. bourbon whiskey (@icarusrex used Elijah Craig 12 Year; we used Woodinville Whiskey Company)
1/2 oz. Zirpenz Stone Pine Liqueur (see note below)
1/2 oz. real maple syrup
3 oz. ginger beer (@icarusrex used Goslings; we used Trader Joe’s)

Shake bourbon, pine liqueur and maple syrup with ice and pour in a glass with ice. Top with ginger beer. Substitute honey syrup for maple syrup for a different flavor.

Note: We had difficulty finding the Zirpenz Stone Pine Liqeur, so we got a little creative; we brewed Douglas Fir tea, made ice cubes out of it, and added that to the drink, replacing the liquid with…. more whiskey.

Northwest Sky AKA Seattle Seagull* or “tastes like you’d expect”) (our own amateur cocktail creation)

1 1/2 oz. Tito’s Vodka
Sparkling water to fill the glass

Salt the rim of a small mason jar, camping mug, or whatever you happen to have around. Add ice cubes, packed snow, or icicles. Pour in vodka and sparkling water.

*Years ago when Tom managed the AYH hostel in Santa Cruz, he met a laconic young man from Denmark who claimed to have been raised in Greenland.

“Wow… tell me something about life in Greenland. What do you recall from living there?”

After some moments of thought, the young man replied “I remember we ate seagulls.”

“So… what do seagulls taste like?” Tom had to ask.

After some further long moments of reflection, the young man shrugged and said “pretty much like you’d expect.”

Seagulls, it turns out, taste like you’re expect them to.

Ever since then Tom has used this story to illustrate a situation when something is more or less self explanatory.

Non-Alcoholic Drinks

TB Non-Alcoholic Cocktail

2 oz. apple juice or apple cider
1/2 oz. real maple syrup or honey syrup
3 oz. ginger beer

Mix in a glass of your choice. Garnish with curled lemon or orange peel.

Cucumber and Fir Non-Alcoholic Cocktail

Sparkling water
3 Cucumber slices
Douglas Fir for garnish
Optional: Douglas Fir Ice Cubes*

Combine sparkling water with two cucumber slices and ice in a glass. Cut the third cucumber slice as a garnish and add it to the rim of the glass along with a piece of Douglas Fir. This very simple drink is quite refreshing, especially for those who prefer a less sweet taste.

*Douglas Fir Ice Cubes
To make: brew Douglas Fir tea. Either collect your own Douglas Fir spring tips (the very bright green, new growth of the tree; take care not to collect all of the tips from the same tree, or same section of the tree) in the spring and dry them for use year ’round or purchase this ready-to-go tea from Juniper Ridge. Let the tea cool and pour it in an ice cube tray. Freeze.

Many thanks again to @icarusrex. See also: his article on Mile High Bartending.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

From all of us at TOM BIHN: Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

Here’s a few photos from last week’s holiday party at the factory. You may be asking: what’s up with all of the beautiful knitted hats? Each year the TOM BIHN Ravelry group knits hats for our entire crew. We’ll post more hat photos next week — stay tuned!

TOM BIHN Bags Holiday Party 2017
Happy Holidays to all of you from all of us!

Tom’s Simplified and (nearly) Painless 2017 Holiday Gift Guide

Tom Bihn Listening to Audibooks While Designing

Much has been said and written about giving gifts that are not things, and about how experiences ultimately mean more to us than stuff. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve observed that more than ever before, I cherish time spent with family and friends, travel to new and old places, fresh air, wildlife, and nature more than a garage full of objects. With that in mind, I’ve in years past given movie, concert or opera tickets as gifts, or even a gift certificate for a massage or kayak rental. So far, so good.

As we set out to create a 2017 version of our Bags and Beyond Gift Guide, we realized we couldn’t improve much on the list of things already in it, and that some of us were giving other types of gifts this year – food, drink, experiences, and…. books.

I am very fond of books and I’ve begun to give them as gifts. The thing of a book is often more the experience of reading it than the possession of it. Coffee table books of art, wildlife, and photography, as well as illustrated works like Eric Sloan’s A Reverence for Wood or Roger Jean Segalat’s How Things Work series, (and yes of course graphic novels, my dear friend Erin the librarian) are exceptions.

My advice this year is: if you feel compelled to give a gift that is a thing, find your way to your local bookstore and buy books. If you see nothing there that seems appropriate to the person on your list, or if you’re like me and everything looks wondrous and beguiling, gift certificates are there for you. Shopping remotely for an out-of-towner? Go to Indie Bookstore Finder and then call the bookstore closest to your friend and buy a gift certificate. Seriously consider the local bookstore rather than the easy way out of online shopping — remember, if you don’t support your local bookstore, it may not be there the next time you look.

Now, back to where I was headed with this…

These past few years I’ve become rather addicted to audio books. I listen when I drive, while I do housework, and even in my studio as I’m working on a new design. I listened to 57 hours of Sherlock Holmes while designing The Hero’s Journey (though I guess I really ought to have been listening to Joseph Campbell); Anna Karenina and The Boys in the Boat while designing the Luminary; News of the World and A Brief History of Time while designing the Pop Tote; Far from the Madding Crowd and The Heart of Everything That Is while working on The Moveable Feast. When a story has really grabbed me, I’ve even been known to listen, unbelievable as this may sound, as I hike. (One must exercise some reasonable caution: as I listened to Sissy Spacek read To Kill a Mockingbird, I had to pull the car over and wipe the tears from my eyes.) I’ve always a few books in queue loaded on to my smartphone, along with some language lessons to break things up (Cantonese and Swahili: I just want to be able to say “hello” and “thank you”.)

I love my audio books.

So with that in mind, and in the spirt of giving things that are not things, this year I am offering up what is perhaps the simplest gift guide ever: after you’ve pillaged the local book store, give Audible.com subscriptions. Yes, I know they are part of Amazon.com, and are therefore somehow cahooting with Darth Vader, but it’s an amazing service: there are not enough hours in the day to ever make a dent in their selection. [Editor’s note: when we sent this post out to our email newsletter list yesterday morning, reader H.C. wrote back to offer an independent bookstore equivalent of Audible — Libro.fm.]

Best wishes to all of you for a grand holiday weekend with friends, family, dogs, cats, and anyone else who is dear.

Cookbooks
Six Seasons: A New Way With Vegetables by Joshua McFadden
The How Not To Die Cookbook by Michael Greger
The Flavor Bible: The Essential Guide to Culinary Creativity, Based on the Wisdom of America’s Most Imaginative Chefs by Karen Page
Clean Cakes by Henrietta Inman

Coffee Table Books
Where The Animals Go: Tracking Wildlife with Technology in 50 Maps and Graphics by by James Cheshire, Oliver Uberti
Sohan Qadri: The Seer by by Various (Editor)

Books For Kids
Big Red Barn and Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling
Matilda by Roald Dahl

Magazines (print or digital) 
Astronomy 
Nautilus 
The New Yorker

Seattle Factory Showroom Open 12/16

Hey Seattle folks!

Join us for a rare Saturday opening of our Factory Showroom on December 16th from 10:00am – 2:00pm. We’ll have hot coffee, homemade cookies, and, of course, bags…

4750A Ohio Ave S – Seattle – 98134

TOM BIHN Seattle Factory Showroom

The Not Very Successful Holiday Photo Shoot

We thought it’d be fun to get a photo of Ichiro and Fiona (two of the dogs on staff here at TOM BIHN) wearing festive holiday antlers while lounging on a Camp Mat, but they had a different idea…

Portable Culture Portrait: ceepee

TOM BIHN Blog | ceepee Fantastic Four

Our Portable Culture Portrait blog series features TOM BIHN Forum members, the bags they carry, and the items they carry in their bags. This edition features ceepee.

Last Week in Photos

Just a few of the great photos you shared with us last week (thank you!)

“Standing by the lake with frozen face.”

Photo by @shouraisan_kaguya

How to Choose a Bag to Give as a Gift

How To Choose A Bag As A Gift | Made in USA Gifts | Made in Seattle Gifts

In this guide, we share some of our favorite bags to give as gifts (hey Pop Tote, Yeoman Duffel, Travel Cubelet and The Guide’s Edition Synapse 25 — we’re talking about you!) and what to do if you aren’t sure which bag to choose for the lucky recipient.

News Briefs

Heads-up! We’ve decided to retire the Road Duffel, Large (sold out) and Road Duffel, Medium (some are still available) to make way for new designs.

Darcy has posted a Forum update on the Small Shop Bag + hints of new designs to come. See here.

We’ve decided to retire the Sprout and Small Shop Bag to make way for new designs. This is the last chance to order them.

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